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8 Reasons Your Muscles Are NOT Growing (Science-Based)

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Find out exactly why your muscles are not growing. If you’re not building muscle make sure that you’re not making these common muscle building mistakes. If you want to ensure that your making preventing muscle loss & instead you’d like to gain muscle mass watch this video. You’ll still grow muscle faster even if you’re currently a skinny guy. As long as you eat the right foods to by following a solid bulking diet plan and your avoiding mistakes in the gym you will be in a great position for muscle growth.

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*Studies in comments

Muscle…It’s definitely not easy to build especially after you’re no longer a beginner so you might be working out hard and you’re eating right, but no matter how hard you try your muscles are still not growing. This is a common problem faced by many guys that workout a lot, but hardly experience any results even if their workouts are already challenging. And really it comes down to 8 key reasons why you’re trying so hard but not seeing much growth. Starting first with a very common training mistake and that’s Not Training Each Muscle Often Enough. A survey of 127 competitive male bodybuilders found that more than two-thirds of them trained each muscle group only once per week. This is what’s known as a bro split where you work pretty much one muscle per day and it allows you to really focus on that muscle and break it down for an incredible pump. But is that optimal? Well, the answer is no, as shown by multiple studies. Specifically in one of these study’s researchers observed the difference in the rate of muscle growth between training a muscle once or three times per week with a similar total training volume between both groups. And the results showed that those who trained each muscle three times per week gained much more muscle than those who trained each muscle less often. In another study, participantseither performed all their weekly exercise volume in one giant full-body workout or they spread out the same training volume so they did the same amount of sets and reps, but they divided that volume into three smaller full-body sessions. And Once again, those who trained more often gained significantly more muscle. The once-a-week subjects increased their lean body mass by 1%. While those that trained each muscle three times per week gained 8 percent. And like I said many other studies also show similar results. (24) One reason why it’s better to train each muscle more often than once a week is that if you do a ton of sets and reps all within one day you’ll inevitably have lower quality sets. After you’ve done a few heavy sets for a specific muscle, the amount of force you’ll be able to produce during later sets will decrease significantly. On the other hand, if you spread that volume out over the week, you’ll be able to perform better for each set because you’ll be less fatigued. Another reason why it’s better to train your muscles at least 2 times a week is that protein synthesis generally only stays elevated levels for up to about 72 hours after a workout. So, if you’re training each muscle only once every seven days, you’ll only trigger growth for up to 72 hours that week and during the other 96 hours of the week, you would miss out on gains.

Now another not so commonly known reason why you’re not building muscle is that You’re Not Consuming Enough Cholesterol. That’s right Not consuming enough cholesterol can definitely slow yourgains. A 12-week long strength training studyfound a linear dose-response relationship between dietary cholesterol intake and lean body mass gains or in other words muscle growth). This means that themore cholesterol they consumed, the more muscle they gained. In another study, researchers compared a high cholesterol diet of 800 milligrams per day to a low cholesterol diet of fewer than 200 milligrams per day And the high cholesterol group had almost a three times higher muscle protein synthesis rate for 22 hours after intense resistance training than the low cholesterol group. This showed that the higher cholesterol diet was beneficial for muscle growth. The researchers concluded that cholesterol may aid muscle growth by helping your body cope with inflammatory responses, and enhancing cellular communication. Now, this is all of course within good reason, there are good sources of cholesterol and there are also bad sources of cholesterol so make sure that you stick to eating enough healthy sources of fat to optimize muscle growth. Moving on we have the next very common mistake that will prevent you from building muscle and that’s not focusing on getting stronger…

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  1. Hope you guys enjoy the video! All 21 references with studies can be found below.

    1. A survey of 127 competitive male bodybuilders found that more than two-thirds of them trained each muscle group only once per week

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22990567

    2. Those who trained each muscle three times per week gained much more muscle than those who trained each muscle less often

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25932981

    3. Many studies show that training each muscle more often than just once a week is much better for growth

    https://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/2000/08000/Comparison_of_1_Day_and_3_Days_Per_Week_of.6.aspx

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25932981

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4885621/

    https://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Citation/2019/07001/High_Resistance_Training_Frequency_Enhances_Muscle.16.aspx

    https://github.com/linkel/Ligand/blob/master/content/Norwegian_High_Frequency_Programs.md.

    4. Protein synthesis generally only stays elevated levels for up to about 72 hours after a workout

    See Fig 1

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25739559

    5. A 12 week long strength training study found a linear dose-response relationship between dietary cholesterol intake and lean body mass gains

    See Fig 1A

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17921432

    6. Researchers compared a high cholesterol diet of 800 milligrams per day to a low cholesterol diet of less than 200 milligrams per day. The high cholesterol group had almost a three times higher muscle protein synthesis rate for 22 hours after intense resistance training than the low cholesterol group.

    https://www.fasebj.org/doi/abs/10.1096/fasebj.25.1_supplement.lb563

    7. The more weight the participants could bench-press The more mass they had on their pecs

    See Graph in Fig 1

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24169471

    8. There's an extremely tight relationship between fat free mass or in other words muscle mass and performance

    https://journals.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/jappl.2000.89.3.1061

    9. In powerlifters, there's a 86 to 95 percent correlation between a lifters muscle mass and their strength and performance in the key power lifts like squats, deadlifts, and bench press

    "Performance of the SQT, BP, and DL was strongly correlated with FFM and FFM relative to standing height (r=0.86 to 0.95, P≤0.001)."

    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00421-001-0543-7

    10. Doing multiple sets per exercise led to 40 percent more muscle growth than doing only one set per exercise

    See Fig 1

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20300012

    11. Doing four to six sets per exercise was superior to two to three sets, and two to three sets were better than doing only one set.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20300012

    12. “Muscle hypertrophy follows a dose-response relationship, with increasingly greater gains achieved with higher training volumes.”

    sci-hub.tw/https://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fulltext/2019/01000/Resistance_Training_Volume_Enhances_Muscle.13.aspx

    13. A 2012 meta-analysis found that adding cardio to a resistance training routine reduced muscle growth effect size by 39 percent

    See Graph

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22002517/

    14. Cardio decreases Mtor and increases AMPK. This is a bad combo for muscle growth

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17095927

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11715023

    15. Participants who ate a small surplus packed on five times less fat than those who consumed an extra 600 calories (larger surplus)

    See Figure 1

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23679146

    16. Ensure that you're consuming at least 1.6 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight or 0.73grams per pound of body weight per day

    See Figure 5

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28698222

    17. Deep squats, as opposed to partial squats, led to much more muscle growth on the quads

    See Fig 4

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23604798

    18. Other studies also show similar results that a full range of motion is better for growth than partial.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22027847

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23629583

    19. Working through a full ROM produces a higher level of muscle activation

    https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/How-deep-should-you-squat-to-maximise-a-holistic-McMahon-Onambele-Pearson/8fe04cf33c093901e435d038a092d59d2cd6febc

    20. You might miss out on stimulating all parts of a specific muscle if you go for partial reps

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23629583

    21. Overloading muscles in their stretched position, which is something that you do with full Range of motion exercises, seems to be particularly important for muscle growth

    https://www.intechopen.com/books/electrodiagnosis-in-new-frontiers-of-clinical-research/how-deep-should-you-squat-to-maximise-a-holistic-training-response-electromyographic-energetic-cardi

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24662234

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